I Tested 4 DIY Fruit Fly Traps to Find The Best Method

DIY fruit fly traps

In tackling fruit flies, options can be limited, and unsightly fly paper was not a choice for me and I was not interested in any devices on the market. Therefore, I turned to the internet and discovered several DIY fruit fly traps, seeking to determine the most effective one, and here are my findings.

DIY Fruit Fly Traps

These DIY fruit fly traps are simple to make and can be effective in reducing fruit fly populations in your home. Experiment with different baits and trap designs to find the one that works best for you. Remember to empty and clean the traps regularly to prevent the buildup of dead flies and bacteria. There is also a fruit fly trap DIY without vinegar used in the trap for those who can’t stand the smell of vinegar.

Materials Needed to Make Each DIY Fruit Fly Trap

  • Mason or glass jar with a lid.
  • Plastic wrap
  • Rubber band
  • Vinegar
  • Dish soap
  • Almost empty wine bottle
  • Piece of paper
  • Nail
  • Hammer

Related: How Effective Are Fruit Fly Traps

1. Glass Jar

Out of the five different methods that we tried, this one was the easiest and traped the most fruit flies. One thing that is nice about this trap is that it can be used over and over again

  • Place over-ripened fruit with some water or sugar water and a few pumps of dish soap in a glass jar.
  • Using a hammer, punch holes in the lid using a nail or cover the opening with plastic wrap, secure it with a rubber band, and poke some holes in the plastic wrap.
  • Fruit flies will be attracted to the scent and drown when they land on the surface because they will sink and be unable to get above the surface.

2. Fruit In a Glass Jar

The idea behind this method is very similar to the first one, but the reason I decided to add this one is that if you don’t have any plastic wrap, then this will work.

  • lace over-ripened fruit with some water or sugar water and a few pumps of dish soap in a glass jar.
  • Roll a piece of paper into a cone shape and place it in the jar with the narrow end pointing down.
  • Tape the cone in place to secure it.
  • Fruit flies will be attracted to the scent and drown when they land on the surface because they will sink and be unable to get above the surface.

3. Apple Cider Vinegar Trap

This method did work, but it wasn’t as effective as the first trap and you do have to deal with the smell of vinegar, which like most people I don’t.

  • Pour apple cider vinegar into a shallow dish or bowl.
  • Add a few drops of dish soap and mix well.
  • Fruit flies will be attracted to the scent of the vinegar, but the soap will break the surface tension, causing them to drown when they land on it.

4. Wine Trap

This was the least effective trap and in my opinion, is not even worth trying. The reason I decided to try this method was because of the amount of people that suggested it.

  • Leave about a quarter cup of wine in the bottle.
  • Add a few drops of dish soap and mix well.
  • Fruit flies will be attracted to the scent of the wine and will drown when they land on the surface because they will sink and be unable to get above the surface.

Placing Your Traps

Strategic placement is key to the trap’s success. Put your traps near areas where you’ve seen the most fruit flies, which are usually near fruit bowls, compost bins, or trash cans. Keep the traps a safe distance from fresh fruit to avoid luring more flies into the kitchen.

Monitoring Effectiveness

After a few hours, you should notice fruit flies inside the trap. Keep an eye on the number of flies caught; a substantial decrease indicates that your traps are working. If there’s no improvement after a day or two, consider relocating the traps to a different spot.

Routine Maintenance and Replacement

Your fruit fly traps will need to be monitored and maintained. Here’s what to look out for:

  • Check the traps regularly and dispose of any captured fruit flies.
  • Refresh the bait every few days, especially if the trap starts to dry up or if the vinegar begins to lose its pungent smell.
  • After about a week, replace the traps entirely.

Additional Preventive Measures

While the traps are a great short-term solution, preventing fruit flies from being attracted to your home is the best long-term plan. Consider these tips:

  • When throwing out overripe or rotting produce, do so outside the home if possible.
  • Keep kitchen surfaces and drains clean, as they can also attract fruit flies
  • Ensure your trash cans have tight-fitting lids and clean them regularly.

In no time, you should see a dramatic reduction in your fruit fly population, and if these options don’t work for you, you could use a Venus fly trap.

Joel Simon

Joel, a seasoned blogger with a passion for home products, has been making waves in the digital realm for the past seven years. With a knack for crafting insightful reviews and informative posts, He has become a trusted voice in the world of home improvement and lifestyle blogging.

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